EUROPEANMOBILITYWEEK News

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Urban transport roadmaps: a web-based tool to help cities develop sustainable mobility strategies

27 April 2017

The urban transport roadmaps tool, developed for DG Move, European Commission, by Ricardo Energy & Environment and Trasporti e Territorio, is a web-based tool to help city authorities develop urban transport roadmaps that address the most pressing environmental, social and economic issues faced by their transportation systems between now and 2030.

The tool provides cities with the ability to identify, develop, screen and assess different transport policies and measures. In particular, it helps cities to quickly and easily assess the likely costs and impacts of measures that could help them improve the sustainability of their transport systems. Cities can explore combinations of different policy scenarios and assess the impacts of these scenarios on the environment, safety, mobility, the economy and the city’s transport system. This type of scenario analysis helps cities to rapidly identify which policy measures are likely to be useful in supporting their own urban transport sustainability goals.

A key benefit of the tool is that users do not need any prior experience in transport modelling. The tool is user-friendly, and has a simple and intuitive graphical user interface.

For more information, visit www.urban-transport-roadmaps.eu

Award winning Malmö uses EUROPEAN MOBILITY WEEK to reach the city's mobility goals

25 April 2017

An interview with Olof Rabe, Mobility Projects Manager, City of Malmö

What activities did Malmö undertake to help it win the EUROPEANMOBILITYWEEK Award?

There are several activities that I think contributed to our success, but if I have to highlight some of them I would say that the temporary reformation of a street, the opportunity for citizens and visitors to discuss mobility issues with officials, and our whole-day conference were three activities that turned out well.

For the whole week we devoted a street in the centre of Malmö to EUROPEANMOBILITYWEEK, focusing on the number of pedestrians and cyclists, and reforming the street into a welcoming space for all people. That became a great activity and left a strong impression that people in the city still talk about.

During the week officials from our Streets and Parks Department were present on the street, and visitors got the opportunity to discuss Malmö’s mobility issues with them.

We also held a whole-day conference on the theme of the year. Invited speakers from different fields talked about the issues from their perspective. Local politicians debated the theme and the information presented. At the end the audience had the opportunity to discuss in smaller groups.

What does winning the EUROPEANMOBILITYWEEK Award mean to the city?

The award is a recognition that we are doing good work when it comes to sustainable mobility. I also think that the award makes the citizens of Malmö proud of their city. Of course, for those involved in the project it is really a fantastic response. As the success of the project increases, the demand also grows to make more efforts for active travel.

What are the benefits of taking part in EUROPEANMOBILITYWEEK from a city perspective?

We have ambitious goals for our future traffic system, as clearly stated in our Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan (SUMP). To accelerate towards our goals, we must first create a greater demand for sustainable mobility. This requires working across all levels in the city. Citizens of Malmö, property owners, shopkeepers and other stakeholders have a key role to play in this development. EUROPEANMOBILITYWEEK is particularly important in this process. It creates commitment and demands in a way that can facilitate the work to reach the city’s goals.

What advice would you give to cities that are looking to follow in your footsteps and take home the EUROPEANMOBILITYWEEK Award?

- Try to combine the event with a city development project.
- Involve the city inhabitants, property owners, business owners and other stakeholders which are most affected by the event and the development project.
- Concentrate the event to a specific location in the city, link all activities to the theme, present the permanent measures under the week, and rather focus on fewer but clearer activities. Also try to have activities every day.
- Evaluate the project. We allowed external actors to do a visitor survey during the week as well as a project evaluation of the entire work process before, during and after the project.

Commission launches competition for young transport innovators

7 April 2017

The European Commission has launched the European Transport Innovation Challenge 2017, a new award offered to young transport innovators for creative solutions for goods and services that will contribute to reducing CO2 emissions in transport.

The solutions can be the result of research, can be in any transport mode, and in many different sectors linked to transport, such as solutions in healthcare, retail or food sectors. The key word is innovation.

The prize will be an all-expenses trip for 12 young innovators aged 18-35 to Strasbourg (France) for the ITS Congress and Exhibition in June 2017.

In addition to receiving free travel and accommodation, and having the opportunity to network with leaders in the world of intelligent transport in Europe, the winners will receive personalised coaching at a dedicated mentoring workshop before the Congress begins.

Applications can come from a person, a team, a company (providing it is an SME) or any other type of legal entity anywhere in the European Union a country associated with the Horizon 2020 programme.

Both individuals (including those working for administrations and transport providers) and SMEs are eligible.

Entrants should describe in less than 1,500 words how mobility in Europe could be cleaner and more efficient. The deadline for applications is 2 May.

For more information, visit ec.europa.eu.